MSC 2015 in Review

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Area Commands

Military Sealift Command Atlantic – Norfolk, Virginia

Sailors prepare to receive fuel hoses aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) during an underway replenishment with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Kanawha (T-AO 196)
Sailors prepare to receive fuel hoses aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) during an underway replenishment with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Kanawha (T-AO 196). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Anderson W. Branch)

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ilitary Sealift Command Atlantic (MSCLANT) executes tactical and administrative control for all Military Sealift Command ships in the Western Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, and in both the Southern Atlantic and Eastern Pacific oceans surrounding Central and South America. MSCLANT schedules and provides all combat logistics support for Commanders, Task Force 80 and 40. Additionally, MSCLANT deploys combat logistics force ships to support U.S. 4th, 5th and 6th Fleets and provides direct support for all carrier strike groups deploying from CTF 80.

MSCLANT maintained daily oversight of approximately 35 ships that loaded and discharged thousands of pieces of government cargo, millions of barrels of petroleum products and tons of ordnance. MSCLANT supported 10 deployments, 14 major fleet exercises, six fleet ordnance moves, two tows and one Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command mission.

USNS Spearhead deployed twice, participating in law enforcement activities, special operations training events, and a series of partner nation engagements in Africa and South America.

Anti-Terrorism Force Protection (ATFP) teams, provided support for 20 high-threat chokepoint transits of the Panama Canal and conducted 23 spot checks onboard MSC ships from New England to the Gulf of Mexico. ATFP coordinated port security and the layberth requirements for large medium-speed roll-on/roll-off ship USNS Mendonca for the first time at Naval Station Norfolk. ATFP support for berthing the ship at the Naval Station enabled MSC to utilize a more efficient government-controlled layberth facility that led to significant utility and facility cost savings compared to private layberth costs.

Operations

MV Ocean Giant transits to the National Science Foundation’s McMurdo Station, Antarctica, through a turning basin opened in the ice by the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star.
The supply ship MV Ocean Giant transits to the National Science Foundation’s McMurdo Station, Antarctica, through a turning basin opened in the ice by the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class George Degener)

Military Sealift Command Pacific – San Diego

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ilitary Sealift Command Pacific (MSCPAC) exercises operational control over Military Sealift Command ships in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of operations in the Eastern Pacific from the U.S. West Coast to the International Dateline. During FY 2015, MSCPAC ships delivered fuel, food, supplies and ammunition to U.S. Navy combatants, performed a variety of special missions, and transported vital military cargo to U.S. and allied nations.

Operations

USNS Navajo (T-ATF 169) passes the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter USCGC Boutwell (WHEC-719) in San Diego Bay, California
The Military Sealift Command fleet ocean tug USNS Navajo (T-ATF 169) passes the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter USCGC Boutwell (WHEC-719) in San Diego Bay, California. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class D’Andre L. Roden)
USS Anchoage (LPD 23), USS Coronado (LCS 4), USNS Millinocket (JHSV 3) and USNS Montford Point (MLP 1) transit in formation
Thad K. Hyatt, 1st Engineer of USNS 1st Lt. Jack Lummus, a cargo ship with Military Sealift Command, supervises U.S. service members supporting Exercise African Lion 15 offload vehicles and gear at a port of Agadir, Morocco. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kelly L. Street, 2D MARDIV COMCAM)

Military Sealift Command Europe and Africa – Naples, Italy

U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Jeffrey Deitel, left, U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. John Carter and Capt. Doug Casavant look on as U.S. Navy Capt. Marc Lederer discusses the importance of joint operations
U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Jeffrey Deitel, left, law enforcement detachment officer-in-charge, U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. John Carter, African Maritime Law Enforcement Partnership officerin-charge, and Capt. Doug Casavant, civil service master of the expeditionary fast transport USNS Spearhead (T-EPF 1), look on as U.S. Navy Capt. Marc Lederer, mission commander of Spearhead, discusses the importance of joint operations during the closing ceremony for African Maritime Law Enforcement Partnership. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Justin R. DiNiro)

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ilitary Sealift Command Europe and Africa (MSCEURAF) directs ships that support U.S. European Command, U.S. Africa Command and U.S. Transportation Command. The MSCEURAF staff also supports Commander, Task Force 63 under U.S. 6th Fleet.

MSCEURAF supports ships deployed to or transiting through the region to conduct combat logistics; theater security cooperation; oceanographic survey; rescue and salvage; maritime prepositioning and sealift operations. During FY 2015, MSCEURAF managed the operations of 55 ships in the EUCOM and AFRICOM areas of responsibility. Combat logistics force ships conducted underway replenishments, delivered millions of gallons of fuel and thousands of pallets of vital food, supplies, mail and other cargo to U.S. and foreign navies throughout the region.

Military Sealift Command assets participated in six major exercises and made more than 294 port calls to 48 different locations. MSCEURAF staff coordinated 49 ship transits through the Strait of Gibraltar. Sealift ships delivered 809 containers of cargo and transferred 7.65 million barrels of fuel to various fuel-bunkering locations throughout Europe.

Operations

U.S. Marines assigned to Task Force Ironhorse gather for a group photo outside the U.S. Naval Ship SGT William R. Button (T-AK 3012) as they prepare for NATO-led Exercise Trident Juncture 2015
U.S. Marines assigned to Task Force Ironhorse gather for a group photo outside the U.S. Naval Ship SGT William R. Button (T-AK 3012) as they prepare for NATO-led Exercise Trident Juncture 2015. (U.S. Army photo by Visual Information Specialist Jason Johnston)

Military Sealift Command Central – Manama, Bahrain

USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5) conducts a vertical replenishment at sea with the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77)
The dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5) conducts a vertical replenishment at sea with the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) in the Persian Gulf. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Scott Barnes)

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ilitary Sealift Command Central (MSCCENT) represents Military Sealift Command in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, which includes the Arabian Gulf, Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman, Horn of Africa, Gulf of Aden, and Red Sea. MSCCENT provides reliable and efficient at-sea combat logistics, special mission support, and maritime services to meet U.S. Central Command requirements.

The MSCCENT commander is also dual-hatted as commander of Logistics Forces U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/ Commander Task Force 53. The commander exercises tactical command of U.S. 5th Fleet air and sea logistics assets.

During FY 2015, combat logistics force ships under MSCCENT’s tactical command conducted replenishment at sea events delivering pallets of food and supplies and millions of gallons of fuel to Navy and coalition ships. Tankers in the MSCCENT area of operations delivered more than 470 million gallons of fuel worth more than $1.5 billion to Department of Defense distribution depots across the region. Additionally, MSC delivered more than 5.7 million pieces of ammunition worth over $520 million. In aggregate, MSCCENT moved over $2.5 billion worth of fuel, stores, ammo, and other supplies to the fleet.

Operations

Military Sealift Command Far East – Singapore

U.S. Marines participating in Amphibious Landing Exercise 2015 transport supplies to the USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2) using components of an Improved Ribbon Bridge pushed by Bridge Erection Boats while executing ship-to-shore transport operations
U.S. Marines participating in Amphibious Landing Exercise 2015 transport supplies to the USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2) using components of an Improved Ribbon Bridge pushed by Bridge Erection Boats while executing ship-to-shore transport operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Drew Tech)

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ilitary Sealift Command Far East (MSCFE) exercises operational control over Military Sealift Command ships that support U.S. Pacific Command, U.S. Transportation Command and U.S. 7th Fleet. MSCFE is co-located with Commander, Logistics Group, Western Pacific/Commander, Task Force 73 at Sembawang Wharves in Singapore. During FY 2015, MSCFE managed a daily average of 47 ships representing all mission areas in the vast U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations.

MSC-chartered shuttle ship, MV Mohegan, moved dry cargo and supplies to and from the remote island of Diego Garcia 12 times during the fiscal year. MSC fuel tankers moved aviation and diesel fuel to ports throughout the region, including Guam, Japan, Republic of Korea, Wake Island, Diego Garcia, Singapore, and Kwajalein Atoll.

Operations